Tag Archives: 3.5 stars

Review: The Dickens With Love

The Dickens With LoveThe Dickens With Love by Josh Lanyon
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The Dickens With Love was first brought to my attention by the illustrious karen whose review of it is far, far funnier than mine. Seriously. Her review is here. Go read it. Then come back to mine.

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Review: John Dies at the End

John Dies at the EndJohn Dies at the End by David Wong
My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

Warning: This Book Contains Multiple Scenes With Disgusting Huge Spiders

*ahem*

I had avoided adding John Dies at the End until a friend roped me into it through a challenge. I have to say, it was a pleasant surprise. Well, maybe not pleasant. That’s not a word that describes, well, anything in this book.

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Review: The Stupidest Angel by Christopher Moore

The Stupidest Angel: A Heartwarming Tale of Christmas TerrorThe Stupidest Angel: A Heartwarming Tale of Christmas Terror by Christopher Moore
My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

The Stupidest Angel: A Heartwarming Tale of Christmas Terror is good stuff. I’ve always been a bit skeptical of Christopher Moore, but I may look into some of his other books. There are zombies, evil Santas, they make fun of those horrible bell ringers, there’s a crazy Zena-type, and a remarkably mentally challenged angel. Oh, and the fruit bat. What’s not to love? I’m not coming up with anything. If you take the holidays seriously, you might disagree and should probably steer clear. There isn’t a lot of Christmas cheer and you’d be horrified by some of the things done to Santa and the Nativity story. If you revel in the irreverent, well, this is the Christmas book for you.

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Review: Heartless

Heartless (The Parasol Protectorate, #4)Heartless by Gail Carriger
My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

Oh, goodreads, why do you let a few people keep the rest of us from having half stars. By rights, Heartless should get 3.5/5 or 6/10 stars. As it is, because I like the series & goodreads is lame, I’m giving it 4. In this latest addition, we see a lot more of the same. The primary plot is nowhere near as interesting as some of the things we learn about our primary and supporting characters. Some of them have pasts much deeper and more complicated than we previously knew. We also learn more about Alexia’s father. Naturally, these are the tamer aspects, but, you know…spoilers! Regardless of the ways this book went flat, I definitely am looking forward to the release in March of the next in the series.

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Review: Blameless

Blameless (The Parasol Protectorate, #3)Blameless by Gail Carriger
My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

I don’t know quite how I would explain why I love Gail Carriger‘s Parasol Protectorate series so much, but I really do. While not so good as the others, Blameless has that same mixture of wit and “d’aww” reaction that I enjoyed in the previous books. As always, Alexia is involved in crazy adventures and Conall rages about wildly. Well, that isn’t all, but it does take up a fair amount. Basically, I continue to recommend these books to those who like Regency romances, even though these are set in Victorian times, as well as those who like light urban fantasy. There’s a little something for everyone here. For me, it’s on to Heartless! (Oh yes, ladybugs and pesto both play major roles in this. What’s not to love?)

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Review: Changeless

Changeless (Parasol Protectorate, #2)Changeless by Gail Carriger
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

While not quite as good as Soulless, Changeless was a delightful read and exactly what I needed to cleanse my brain after reading American Psycho. Gail Carriger writes good, funny yarns. There is a definite amount of repetition, but it can be forgiven. I can’t bring myself to say that her stories and characters are original, but there is a certain freshness to her stories. Perhaps it is the way her points of view are written or the very, very mild inclusion of a few steampunk elements. Regardless, I look forward to continuing the series. I mean, how often are Victorian romances & fantasy mixed without being tedious? Not often enough, I say.

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Review: Soulless

Soulless (Parasol Protectorate, #1)Soulless by Gail Carriger
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This book brings together so many things I love: kickass female heroines who don’t dress like they belong in a film mockery of an S&M video, food, vampires and other such magical types, love, dirty scenes, and the London Season. Didn’t see that last one coming, did you? Well, it’s true. Gail Carriger manages to fit all these things into Soulless, a book that is more funny than sincere, more romance than steampunk, and less creepy than you might think when you realize what the main couple has to overcome. Basically, I recommend it, despite being skeptical when I picked it up. It’s fun in so many ways.

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Review: The Duke And I

The Duke And I (Bridgertons, #1)The Duke And I by Julia Quinn
My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

Oh the cheesy Regency romance. What a place it holds in my heart. Perfectly mindless and heartwarming despite the massive amounts of suspension of disbelief required. The Duke And I is the first, but will not be the last of Julia Quinn‘s books I read. It struck a fantastic balance between funny and sweet. In the creation of the hilarious Bridgerton family it added that excellent dynamic of The Overprotective Older Brother and Possibly Crazy Mother that makes these books delightful. I know I’m raving shamelessly. It could be the allergy medication or it could be that this is a fun book. I’ll leave the determination to you.

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Review: Bossypants

BossypantsBossypants by Tina Fey
My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

Tina Fey is one of the funniest women in the comedy world. Bossypants is her venture into the comic memoir and it is a success. I highly recommend that you listen to the audio book. While the first third, largely a description of the years before she moved to New York, dragged a little bit, by the time she hit NBC she was in perfect groove. Ever wondered what it is like to be in a photo shoot? Want to know more about raising a child who has always seen her mother in the media sphere? Have you ever wondered the correct way to put on eye cream? All this and more are included in this truly hilarious tale. Go listen to it. Now.

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Review: The Turn of the Screw

The Turn of the ScrewThe Turn of the Screw by Henry James
My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

Forget cabins in remote wooded places or suspicious small towns; I am convinced that English country houses, particularly in cloudy areas, are the most dangerous places to live or visit. At best, you’ll be robbed of something valuable. Maybe something you own will turn out to be cursed. Most likely you or someone else in the house will be brutally murdered. If you’re lucky, that is. The characters in The Turn of the Screw do not get off so lightly. The book is narrated from the point of view of a governess who may or may not be insane and includes such staples as precocious and creepy orphans, possible ghosts, mysterious pasts, and a handsome but distant master. A very good book to read for Halloween and one which will likely be argued over until the end of humanity.

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